ON SALE NOW: 15% Off American Expedition Brand
Free Shipping at $50 (Economy Shipping to Continental US Addresses Only)
15% Off American Expedition Brand
FREE SHIPPING AT $50!
*Continental US Addresses Only*

Pronghorn Antelope Facts, Information, and Habitat

Small but relentless, the pronghorn antelope is always aware of its surroundings and teaches us that although you may not excel in one thing, you were given other gifts that you benefit from and therefore set you apart from everyone else.

Pronghorn Antelope(Antilocapra Americana) are iconic symbols of the grasslands and are renowned for being North America’s fastest land mammal. American Expedition is proud to present Pronghorn Antelope Information, Interesting Pronghorn Facts, Pronghorn Habitat Info, and Photos of the Pronghorn Antelope.

Pronghorn Antelope facts, information, photos, and habitat.

Photo by Michael Wifall on Flickr


Pronghorn Antelope Information

Pronghorn get their name from the prominent pair of horns they display on the top of their head. The horns are branched with two points, made of bone, and covered with a keratinous casing which is shed and regrown annually. These animals measure four to five feet long from nose to tail, and are approximately three and a half feet tall. The females weigh around 75-110 pounds, while the males weigh 90-140 pounds. They are reddish-brown in color and have a white stomach, behind, throat, and parts of the facial area are also white.

Breeding season for pronghorn is in mid September. Bucks gather harems of females and protect them from other male pronghorns. Many times they get into battles with each other over the female pronghorn. Gestations period of a pronghorn is typically 235 days. In the spring, the females give birth to one or two fawns. They stay hidden in the vegetation for about 25 days, until they join a “nursery” with other fawns and mothers. Sexually maturity is reached at 15 months but males do not breed until the age of three. The lifespan of a pronghorn in the wild is 10-15 years.

Pronghorn Antelope Facts

  • Pronghorns can run up to 65 miles per hour.
  • Pronghorn are not very good jumpers. If there is a fence, they will climb under instead of jumping over.
  • Pronghorns are herbivores.
  • Lewis and Clark were the first ones to scientifically document Pronghorn Antelope.
  • A group of pronghorns is called a “band” or “herd”.
  • A female pronghorn is known as a “doe” and a male is called a “buck.”
  • The juvenile pronghorns are called “fawns.”
  • The outer material on a pronghorn’s antlers is shed and regrown each year.
  • Pronghorn have very large eyes and can see 320 degrees around.
  • When a pronghorn is startled, they raise the hair on their rump and the white patch can be seen for miles.
  • Pronghorns chew their cud.
  • In some states, you can legally hunt pronghorn.
  • Pronghorns can eat plants found in the grasslands that are toxic to domestic animals.

Pronghorn Antelope Habitat

The pronghorn is a species that occupies western and central North America. They live mainly in the grassland regions, but herds can also be found in the deserts. Pronghorns are herbivores and their diet consists of grass, vegetation, cacti, forbs, and shrubs.

Pronghorn Antelope are the fastest animals in North America, capable at running of speeds up to 65 miles per hour.

A male pronghorn antelope with two females on a bluff.

During the breeding season, Pronghorn bucks gather harems of females and protect them from other male pronghorns.

Two pronghorn antelope with their heads turned.

Pronghorn have very large eyes and can see 320 degrees around.

A grazing pronghorn antelope.

Pronghorns can eat plants found in the grasslands that are toxic to domestic animals.

A pronghorn antelope alert for danger.

The horns of a Pronghorn Antelope are branched with two points, made of bone, and covered with a keratinous casing which is shed and regrown annually.

Two pronghorn antelope nosing each other.

Lewis and Clark were the first ones to scientifically document Pronghorn Antelope.

Group of pronghorn antelope running.

Pronghorns can run up to 65 miles per hour. Photo by USDAGov on Flickr

Pronghorn Antelope Information, Facts, and Photos
50