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Largemouth Bass Information, Photos & Facts

Like nearly everything worth seeking, catching a Largemouth Bass takes patience, knowledge, and sometimes luck.

Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) are the most popular game fish in North America. Possessing a striking complexion while being one of the top predators in the natural ecosystem, the Largemouth Bass is an astonishing aquatic animal. American Expedition is proud to present information, interesting facts, fishing tips, habitat info, and artwork and photos of the Largemouth Bass.

Largemouth Bass Facts, Information, Habitat, Fishing Tips, and Photos from American Expedition.

      

Largemouth Bass Information

Adult largemouth bass are solitary fish, although occasionally several bass will congregate in areas with abundant food supplies. They are usually the apex predator in their habitat. They will hide between rocks, among water vegetation, or under roots and limbs of sunken trees, striking at their prey from the shadows. Bass prefer quiet, calm, and warm water but are very adaptable to other conditions. They are found in rivers, lakes, ponds, reservoirs, and steams.

A sketch of a Largemouth Bass.

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Adult largemouth bass prefer to feed on small fish like perch, sunfish, and minnows. However, they are also known to eat crayfish, insects, frogs, and even small aquatic birds. A bass under two inches, known as a “fry,” will do not act as predators but instead feed on zooplankton and insect larvae.

      

Largemouth Bass Facts

  • Extremely young largemouth bass under 2 inches are known as "fry" and feed primarily on zooplankton and insect larvae. At 2 inches, they become active predators.
  • The largemouth bass has a number of aliases: the widemouth bass, Florida bass, black bass, bigmouth bass, bucketmouth bass, green bass, green trout, southern largemouth and northern largemouth.
  • Largemouth bass do better in the wild than in captivity.
  • A bass’ average lifespan is about 16 years, but have been known to live more than 20 years.
  • Largemouth bass have a highly attuned sense of smell, and can zero in on prey by following scent trails.
  • Female largemouth bass are usually larger than male largemouth bass of the same age.
  • Largemouth bass will often breach the surface of the water and become airborne when hooked in an effort to break free.
  • It is encouraged among anglers to release large specimens of largemouth bass, because the larger fish are usually breeding females that contribute to future fishing stock.
  • Largemouth bass are very aggressive fish, and are known to strike at nearly anything they consider alive.
  • Adult largemouth bass are usually solitary creatures, unless they are males guarding a brood swarm.
  • Adult male largemouth bass are responsible for preparing a nest, usually one to five feet below the water. Once the nest is built, a female will lay between 2,000 and 40,000 eggs, which the male will stay to guard over a week. When the babies hatch, they stay in the nest for a week.
  • Largemouth fry will stay in a school for three to four weeks, called a "brood swarm," which is guarded by their father.
  • The largemouth bass is the state fish of Georgia and Mississippi, official freshwater fish of Alabama and Florida, and the official sport fish of Tennessee.
  • A 5 pound bass is considered large to most anglers.
A swimming Largemouth Bass.

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  • The world record bass was caught in 1932 and weighed 22 pounds 4 ounces. In 2009, the same size bass was caught in Japan to tie the record.
  • Bass never stop growing; the larger the fish the older it usually is.
  • The natural predator list for a bass is small. It mainly consists of walleye, muskie, and northern pike.
  • Because of light intensity, largemouth bass tend to be more active early and late in the day.
      

Largemouth Bass Habitat

Adult largemouth bass are solitary fish, although occasionally several bass will congregate in areas with abundant food supplies. They are usually the apex predator in their habitat. They will hide between rocks, among water vegetation, or under roots and limbs of sunken trees, striking at their prey from the shadows. Bass prefer quiet, calm, and warm water but are very adaptable to other conditions. They are found in rivers, lakes, ponds, reservoirs, and steams.

What Do Largemouth Bass Eat? 

Adult largemouth bass prefer to feed on small fish like perch, sunfish, and minnows. However, they are also known to eat crayfish, insects, frogs, and even small aquatic birds. A bass under two inches, known as a “fry,” will do not act as predators but instead feed on zooplankton and insect larvae.    

Largemouth Bass Fishing Tips

  • Feeding habits depend on a variety of different factors such as weather, season, and time of day.
  • Due to sensitivity to light, largemouth bass are more active early and late in the day.
  • Early spring is the easiest time to hook a largemouth because they will start moving closer to the surface.
  • Although springtime will give you the most luck out on the water, bass can bite year-round.
  • Find the correct fishing reel that you feel most comfortable using. The spin cast reel is the easiest to use for a beginner.
  • The most common lures used for bass fishing include plastic worms, jigs, crankbaits, spinnerbaits, and spoons.
  • Bass are opportunist foragers, so experiment with different types of bait and lures.
  • Although artificial lures are the most ordinarily used, good baits also include nightcrawlers and small shad or crayfish.
  • Bass are known for being tough fighters when reeling them in.
  • Largemouth bass are most attracted to the color red.
  • To correctly hold a bass, put its bottom lip between your thumb and bended pointer finger. Be sure to maintain a tight grip.
  • Each state has varying fishing regulations. It is important to educate yourself on them before going out to fish.
  • Remember to acquire a fishing permit if taking up this sport. Fishing without a permit is illegal and could result in a fine. Many states allow young children or veterans to fish without a permit.
  • Although many fish have an open season of all year, there are some that do not. Look at your state’s regulations to find out when you are allowed to fish.
  • Most states have a length limit for their fish. If the fish you caught does not measure the minimum, it is required that you let it go. There are sometimes maximum limits for certain fish as well.
  • Most states also have daily limits, or the amount of a certain fish you can keep in one day.

In this video, a largemouth bass is shown swimming underwater.

Front view of a largemouth bass.

Largemouth bass are typically the apex predator in their habitat.

A largemouth bass being held by a human hand.

When holding a largemouth bass, it is important to hold it by its lips or body, not by the gills.

A largemouth bass underwater.

Largemouth bass will often hide under logs or vegetation and strike out at their prey from the shadows.

A largemouth bass on a fishing line.

Largemouth bass are one of the most popular sport fish in the world, and have been introduced to every continent but Antarctica.

A largemouth bass in murky water.

Adult largemouth bass are usually solitary creatures.

A largemouth bass leaping from the water with a hook in its mouth.

Largemouth bass will often breach the surface of the water and become airborne when hooked in an effort to break free.

A largemouth bass swimming below the surface.

The largemouth bass has a number of aliases: the widemouth bass, Florida bass, black bass, bigmouth bass, bucketmouth bass, green bass, green trout, southern largemouth and northern largemouth.

A largemouth bass being held up by a fisherman.

It is encouraged among anglers to release large specimens of largemouth bass, because the larger fish are usually breeding females that contribute to future fishing stock.

A largemouth bass swimming with its fins extended.

Because of light intensity, largemouth bass tend to be more active early and late in the day.

A largemouth bass in murky water.

Bass never stop growing; the larger the fish the older it usually is.

Largemouth Bass Facts, Information, and Photos
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